Åk 6–9
 
English/Svenska

3.6 Tables
In a table, we structure and order facts so that they are easier to read and understand what is presented.

Imagine that you got the information presented for you like this:

The number of students in class 8A which have gotten different grades in Swedish, English, Biology and History looks like the following:

Swedish: 12 G, 7 VG, 3 MVG i 2 IG.
English: 9G, 11 VG, 3 MVG i 1 IG.
Biology: 8 G, 7 VG, 5 MVG i 4 IG.
History: 10 G, 9 VG, 4 MVG i 1 IG.

or like this:

Grades in class 8A



Isn’t it good to use tables?



A table consists of columns and rows which have clear headings.
Units can be written either in the tables or in a table key.

Table Headlines
Are written over the table itself.  Here is also written an explanatory text about what the table contains.  If the values’s units are not written in the table, it is written here, for example that “all values expressed in %”.


Frequency Table
By frequency, we mean occurring, in other words how much or often something occurs.  This occurance can be summarized in a table.  This table is called a frequency table.

Here is an example:

In class 7D, the students were asked in which month they were born.  The teacher then wrote every student’s birth month on the board:

March

August

May

July

April

March

March

February

December

September

April

January

June

July

August

January

June

April

October

August

September

May

July

May

October

March

March

February

Then the teacher summarized the results in the form of a frequency table.

By frequency, we mean the number of time every month occurs.  The relative frequency is calculated by dividing the frequency (part) by the total number of students (proportion).  In this study, we can then see that for example 17.9 % of the students in class 7D are born during the month of March.